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Young Toddlers

Approximately 12-16 months old

Safe and Nurturing Young Toddler Program

People often talk about the “BeanTree Difference”. The Young Toddler Program is a very special room and a perfect example of what makes us different. Moving from an Infant Program to a Toddler Program can be very challenging for young children. Our Young Toddler Program bridges this transition to toddlers by offering extra space and time for children who are beginning to toddle, learning to walk, and gaining independent feeding skills. These older babies grow and thrive in the Young Toddler Program.

The Young Toddlers are transitioning. They are going from sleeping in cribs to resting on a mat, from eating baby food in a high chair to eating finger foods at a table, from drinking with a bottle to sipping from a sippy cup. This room and the teachers in it provide a safe and nurturing space for young toddlers to become confident in these new skills.

In the Young Toddler Program, there is also more structure to the daily schedule than in the Infant Program. There is a routine and schedule that allows for mealtime, nap time, circle time, Buggy Rides and trips to the Active Arts Studio, Pagoda Theater, Outdoor Playscape, Olympia Gym. The Young Toddler to Teacher ratio remains at 3:1, just as in our Infant Program, allowing these young toddlers the opportunity for closely supervised independence.

These Young Toddlers are all about exploring their environment. They are becoming more independent and are so proud of themselves as they accomplish each new task!

Activities

Cognitive activities include:
  • Identifying colors and shapes
  • Putting puzzles together
  • Pointing to objects and saying the word
Language activities include:
  • Transitioning from infant sign language to spoken words
  • Participating in short circle times with stories and instruments
  • Learning to predict “what comes next”
Fine motor activities include:
  • Learning to feed themselves
  • Gluing parts of a face on a paper. (We believe that the process is important – not necessarily the product!)
  • Playing with puppets
Gross motor activities include:
  • Walking
  • Throwing balls
  • Playing with a parachute
Social/emotional activities include:
  • Learning to use “gentle hands”
  • Identifying friends & greeting each other
  • Assuming some responsibility – placing their cups in the sink after meals

We look forward to helping your "young toddler" develop into an adventurous toddler.